Articles

New Arrivals - October 2011

These just in:

Lethal by Sandra Brown. In her latest tale Brown returns o the bayous of Louisiana to deliver a heart-pounding tale of corruption, betrayal and murder.

Murder in the 11th House by Mitchell Scott Lewis. Detective David Lowell uses astrological charts to solve a murder case. Library Journal says, “It’s a perfect afternoon read that will provoke smiles…..this series debut has tremendous potential.” Get in on the ground floor, start reading him now!

Shock Wave by John Sandford. The latest from Sandford is a Virgil Flowers mystery. A super-store chain, PyeMart, wants to open a location in a Minnesota river town. Local merchants and environmental groups oppose the project. Their objections seem to have little effect, until someone decides to take matters into their own hands.

Feast Day of Fools by James Lee Burke. Sheriff Hackberry Holland patrols a small Southwest Texas border town with a deep and abiding respect for the citizens in his care.  This novel follows Rain Gods, Burke’s Hackberry Holland tale from 2007.

The Ballad of Tom Dooley:a ballad novel by Sharyn McCrumb. Maybe you remember the song, Hang down your head Tom Dooley. This is a fictionalized account of the haunting tale of murder and illicit love, based on actual events that took place in North Carolina in the aftermath of the Civil War. The author has unearthed some new evidence revealing the true story behind the ballad.

Confidence Men by Ron Suskind. Suskind is a Pulitzer prize winning journalist and served as the senior national affairs writer for the Wall Street Journal for nearly a decade. In this, his latest work, he write about the hidden history of Wall Street and the White House and what happened when a major economic disaster crossed paths with a new and inexperienced American President.

Painting and Wallpapering Secrets by Brian Santos, the Wall Wizard.  Here’s a great DIY book covering a multitude of wall covering techniques. With a primer on basic wall-painting, sections on product, tools and techniques and lots of photos showing you HOW TO accomplish various faux finishes and HOW TO successfully apply wallpaper, this works great if you’re about to embark on a wall-covering project, or it you’re just looking for ideas.

These are only a FEW of the books recently delivered to the library! You can put any of them ON HOLD online, or feel welcome to stop in or give us a call at the library.

September New Releases

.

Fiction:

Cold Vengeance (Special Agent Pendergast Series #11) by Douglas Preston , Lincoln Child.

Devastated by the discovery that his wife, Helen, was murdered, Special Agent Pendergast must have retribution. But revenge is not simple. As he stalks his wife's betrayers-a chase that takes him from the wild moors of Scotland to the bustling streets of New York City and the darkest bayous of Louisiana-he is also forced to dig further into Helen's past. And he is stunned to learn that Helen may have been a collaborator in her own murder.

Peeling back the layers of deception, Pendergast realizes that the conspiracy is deeper, goes back generations, and is more monstrous than he could have ever imagined-and everything he's believed, everything he's trusted, everything he's understood . . . may be a horrific lie.

Back of Beyond by C. J. Box.

Cody Hoyt, while a brilliant cop, is an alcoholic struggling with two months of sobriety when his mentor and AA sponsor Hank Winters is found burned to death in a remote mountain cabin. At first it looks like the suicide of a man who’s fallen off the wagon, but Cody knows Hank better than that. Sober for fourteen years, Hank took pride in his hard-won sobriety and never hesitated to drop whatever he was doing to talk Cody off a ledge. When Cody takes a closer look at the scene of his friend’s death, it becomes apparent that foul play is at hand. After years of bad behavior with his department, he’s in no position to be investigating a homicide, but this man was a friend and Cody’s determined to find his killer.

When clues found at the scene link the murderer to an outfitter leading tourists on a multi-day wilderness horseback trip into the remote corners of Yellowstone National Park—a pack trip that includes his son Justin—Cody is desperate to get on their trail and stop the killer before the group heads into the wild. Among the tourists is fourteen-year-old Gracie Sullivan, an awkward but intelligent loner who begins to suspect that someone in their party is dangerous.

In a fatal cat and mouse game, where it becomes apparent the murderer is somehow aware of Cody’s every move, Cody treks into the wilderness to stop a killer hell bent on ruining the only thing in his life he cares about.

Bad Intentions by Karin Fossum , Charlotte Barslund (Translator).

In the wake of Stieg Larsson’s best-selling novels, readers are discovering the rich trove of modern Scandinavian crime fiction. If you’ve devoured the Millennium trilogy and are looking for your next read, Karin Fossum and her bone-chillingly bleak psychological thrillers have won the admiration of the likes of Ruth Rendell and Colin Dexter (of Inspector Morse fame).

In Bad Intentions, the newest installment in the Inspector Sejer series since The Water’s Edge in 2009, Konrad Sejer must face down his memories and fears as he struggles to determine why the corpses of troubled young men keep surfacing in local lakes.

The first victim, Jon Moreno, was getting better. His psychiatrist said so, and so did his new friend at the hospital, Molly Gram, with her little-girl-lost looks. He was racked by a mysterious guilt that had driven him to a nervous breakdown one year earlier. But when he drowns in Dead Water Lake, Sejer hesitates to call it a suicide.

Then another corpse is found in a lake, a Vietnamese immigrant. And Sejer begins to feel his age weigh on him. Does he still have the strength to pursue the elusive explanations for human evil?

Retribution (Dark-Hunter Series #21) by Sherrilyn Kenyon.

A hired gunslinger, William Jessup Brady lived his life with one foot in the grave. He believed that every life had a price. Until the day when he finally found a reason to live. In one single act of brutal betrayal, he lost everything, including his life. Brought back by a Greek goddess to be one of her Dark-Hunters, he gave his immortal soul for vengeance and swore he’d spend eternity protecting the humans he’d once considered prey.

Orphaned as a toddler, Abigail Yager was taken in by a family of vampires and raised on one belief—Dark-Hunters are the evil who prey on both their people and mankind, and they must all be destroyed. While protecting her adoptive race, she has spent her life eliminating the Dark-Hunters and training for the day when she meeting the man who killed her family: Jess Brady.

A gun in the hand is worth two in the holster…

Jess has been charged with finding and terminating the creature who’s assassinating Dark-Hunters. The last thing he expects to find is a human face behind the killings, but when that face bears a striking resemblance to the one who murdered him centuries ago, he knows something evil is going on. He also knows he’s not the one who killed her parents. But Abigail refuses to believe the truth and is determined to see him dead once and for all.

Brought together by an angry god and chased by ancient enemies out to kill them both, they must find a way to overcome their mutual hatred or watch as one of the darkest of powers rises and kills both the races they’ve sworn to protect.

Northwest Angle (Cork O'Connor Series #11) by William Kent Krueger .

With his family caught in the crosshairs of a group of brutal killers, detective Cork O’Connor must solve the murder of a young girl in the latest installment of William Kent Krueger’s unforgettable New York Times bestselling series.

During a houseboat vacation on the remote Lake of the Woods, a violent gale sweeps through unexpectedly, stranding Cork and his daughter, Jenny, on a devastated island where the wind has ushered in a force far darker and more deadly than any storm.

Amid the wreckage, Cork and Jenny discover an old trapper’s cabin where they find the body of a teenage girl. She wasn’t killed by the storm, however; she’d been bound and tortured before she died. Whimpering sounds coming from outside the cabin lead them to a tangle of branches toppled by the vicious winds. Underneath the debris, they find a baby boy, hungry and dehydrated, but still very much alive. Powerful forces intent on securing the child pursue them to the isolated Northwest Angle, where it’s impossible to tell who among the residents is in league with the devil. Cork understands that to save his family he must solve the puzzle of this mysterious child whom death follows like a shadow.

“Part adventure, part mystery, and all knockout thriller” (Booklist ), Northwest Angle is a dynamic addition to William Kent Krueger’s critically acclaimed, award-winning series.

read more With his family caught in the crosshairs of a group of brutal killers, detective Cork O’Connor must solve the murder of a young girl in the latest installment of William Kent Krueger’s unforgettable New York Times bestselling series.

During a houseboat vacation on the remote Lake of the Woods, a violent gale sweeps through unexpectedly, stranding Cork and his daughter, Jenny, on a devastated island where the wind has ushered in a force far darker and more deadly than any storm.

Amid the wreckage, Cork and Jenny discover an old trapper’s cabin where they find the body of a teenage girl. She wasn’t killed by the storm, however; she’d been bound and tortured before she died. Whimpering sounds coming from outside the cabin lead them to a tangle of branches toppled by the vicious winds. Underneath the debris, they find a baby boy, hungry and dehydrated, but still very much alive. Powerful forces intent on securing the child pursue them to the isolated Northwest Angle, where it’s impossible to tell who among the residents is in league with the devil. Cork understands that to save his family he must solve the puzzle of this mysterious child whom death follows like a shadow.

Kill Me If You Can by James Patterson , Marshall Karp.

Matthew Bannon, a poor art student living in New York City, finds a duffel bag filled with diamonds during a chaotic attack at Grand Central Station. Plans for a worry-free life with his gorgeous girlfriend Katherine fill his thoughts--until he realizes that he is being hunted, and that whoever is after him won't stop until they have reclaimed the diamonds and exacted their revenge.

Trailing him is the Ghost, the world's greatest assassin, who has just pulled off his most high-profile hit: killing Walter Zelvas, a top member of the international Diamond Syndicate. There's only one small problem: the diamonds he was supposed to retrieve from Zelvas are missing. Now, the Ghost is on Bannon's trail--but so is a rival assassin who would like nothing more than to make the Ghost disappear forever. From "America's #1 storyteller" (Forbes) comes a high-speed, high-stakes, winner-take-all thrill ride of adrenaline-fueled suspense.

Non-Fiction:

A Covert Affair: Julia Child and Paul Child in the OSS by Jennet Conant.

Bestselling author Jennet Conant brings us a stunning account of Julia and Paul Child’s experiences as members of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in the Far East during World War II and the tumultuous years when they were caught up in the McCarthy Red spy hunt in the 1950s and behaved with bravery and honor. It is the fascinating portrait of a group of idealistic men and women who were recruited by the citizen spy service, slapped into uniform, and dispatched to wage political warfare in remote outposts in Ceylon, India, and China.

The eager, inexperienced 6 foot 2 inch Julia springs to life in these pages, a gangly golf-playing California girl who had never been farther abroad than Tijuana. Single and thirty years old when she joined the staff of Colonel William Donovan, Julia volunteered to be part of the OSS’s ambitious mission to develop a secret intelligence network across Southeast Asia. Her first post took her to the mountaintop idyll of Kandy, the headquarters of Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten, the supreme commander of combined operations. Julia reveled in the glamour and intrigue of her overseas assignment and lifealtering romance with the much older and more sophisticated Paul Child, who took her on trips into the jungle, introduced her to the joys of curry, and insisted on educating both her mind and palate. A painter drafted to build war rooms, Paul was a colorful, complex personality. Conant uses extracts from his letters in which his sharp eye and droll wit capture the day-to-day confusion, excitement, and improbability of being part of a cloak- and-dagger operation.

When Julia and Paul were transferred to Kunming, a rugged outpost at the foot of the Burma Road, they witnessed the chaotic end of the war in China and the beginnings of the Communist revolution that would shake the world. A Covert Affair chronicles their friendship with a brilliant and eccentric array of OSS agents, including Jane Foster, a wealthy, free-spirited artist, and Elizabeth MacDonald, an adventurous young reporter. In Paris after the war, Julia and Paul remained close to their intelligence colleagues as they struggled to start new lives, only to find themselves drawn into a far more terrifying spy drama. Relying on recently unclassified OSS and FBI documents, as well as previously unpublished letters and diaries, Conant vividly depicts a dangerous time in American history, when those who served their country suddenly found themselves called to account for their unpopular opinions and personal relationships.

History Afield: Stories from the Golden Age of Wisconsin Sporting Life by Robert C Willging.

Stories of sportsmen past come to life in History Afield, an account of the many and varied sporting pursuits that are part of the Wisconsin tradition. Author and outdoorsman Robert Willging shares more than two dozen tales of Wisconsin sporting history, highlighting the hunt for waterfowl, upland birds, and deer; trout fishing in wild north Wisconsin rivers; and recreating at early Wisconsin lakeside resorts.

Anecdotes of fishing exploits on our plentiful waterways and presidential visits to northern Wisconsin reveal a unique slice of sporting culture, and chapters on live decoys and the American Water Spaniel demonstrate the human-animal bond that has played such a large part in that history. Tales of nature’s fury include a detailed account of the famous Armistice Day storm, as well as the dangers of ice fishing on Lake Superior. These historical musings and perspectives on sporting ethos provide a strong sense of the lifestyle that Willging has preserved for our new century.

Featuring first-hand interviews and a variety of historic photos depicting the Wisconsin sporting life, History Afield shows how the intimate relationship between humans and nature shaped this important part of the state’s heritage.

Tavern League: Portraits of Wisconsin Bars by Carl Corey.

In Tavern League, photographer Carl Corey documents a unique and important segment of the Wisconsin community. Our bars are unique micro-communities, offering patrons a sense of belonging. Many of these bars are the only public gathering place in the rural communities they serve. These simple taverns offer the individual the valuable opportunity for face to face conversation and camaraderie, particularly as people become more physically isolated through the accelerated use of the internet’s social networking, mobile texting, gaming, and the rapid-fire of email.

This collection of 60 pictures captures the Wisconsin tavern as it is today. Carl Corey’s view is both familiar and undeniably unique, his pictures resonant with anyone who has set foot in a Wisconsin tavern. As the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Mary Louise Schumacher has written, “Carl Corey’s photographs . . . document iconic American places that are taken for granted. . . . They are comforting images, places we know, but also eerie and remote, presented with a sense of romance and nostalgia that suggests they are already past.”

1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann. 

From the author of 1491—the best-selling study of the pre-Columbian Americas—a deeply engaging new history of the most momentous biological event since the death of the dinosaurs.

More than 200 million years ago, geological forces split apart the continents. Isolated from each other, the two halves of the world developed radically different suites of plants and animals. When Christopher Columbus set foot in the Americas, he ended that separation at a stroke. Driven by the economic goal of establishing trade with China, he accidentally set off an ecological convulsion as European vessels carried thousands of species to new homes across the oceans.

The Columbian Exchange, as researchers call it, is the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand. More important, creatures the colonists knew nothing about hitched along for the ride. Earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; rats of every description—all of them rushed like eager tourists into lands that had never seen their like before, changing lives and landscapes across the planet.

Eight decades after Columbus, a Spaniard named Legazpi succeeded where Columbus had failed. He sailed west to establish continual trade with China, then the richest, most powerful country in the world. In Manila, a city Legazpi founded, silver from the Americas, mined by African and Indian slaves, was sold to Asians in return for silk for Europeans. It was the first time that goods and people from every corner of the globe were connected in a single worldwide exchange. Much as Columbus created a new world biologically, Legazpi and the Spanish empire he served created a new world economically.

Out of the Northwoods: The Many Lives of Paul Bunyan, With More Than 100 Logging Camp Tales by Michael Edmonds.

Every American has heard of the lumberjack hero Paul Bunyan and his big blue ox. For 100 years his exploits filled cartoons, magazines, short stories, and children's books, and his name advertised everything from pancake breakfasts to construction supplies. By 1950 Bunyan was a ubiquitous icon of America's strength and ingenuity. Until now, no one knew where he came from—and the extent to which this mythical hero is rooted in Wisconsin.

Out of the Northwoods presents the culture of nineteenth-century lumberjacks in their own words. It includes eyewitness accounts of how the first Bunyan stories were shared on frigid winter nights, around logging camp stoves, in the Wisconsin pinery. It describes where the tales began, how they moved out of the forest and into print, and why publication changed them forever.

Part bibliographic mystery and part social history, Out of the Northwoods explains for the first time why we all know and love Paul Bunyan. An appendix includes more than 100 original tales about Bunyan, his camps, his crew, and his adventures taken directly from loggers early in the last century.

The Ledge: An Adventure Story of Friendship and Survival on Mount Rainier by Jim Davidson , Kevin Vaughan.

In June 1992, best friends Jim Davidson and Mike Price stood triumphantly atop Washington’s Mount Rainier, celebrating what they hoped would be the first of many milestones in their lives as passionate young mountaineers. Instead, their conquest gave way to catastrophe when a cave-in plunged them deep inside a glacial crevasse—the pitch-black, ice-walled hell that every climber’s nightmares are made of.

An avid adventurer from an early age, Davidson was already a seasoned climber at the time of the Rainier ascent, fully aware of the risks and hopelessly in love with the challenge. But in the blur of a harrowing free fall, he suddenly found himself challenged by nature’s grandeur at its most unforgiving. Trapped on a narrow, unstable frozen ledge, deep below daylight and high above a yawning chasm, he would desperately battle crumbling ice and snow that threatened to bury him alive, while struggling in vain to save his fatally injured companion. And finally, with little equipment, no partner, and rapidly dwindling hope, he would have to make a fateful choice—between the certainty of a slow, lonely death or the seeming impossibility of climbing for his life.

At once a heart-stopping adventure story, a heartfelt memoir of friendship, and a stirring meditation on fleeting mortality and immutable nature, The Ledge chronicles one man’s transforming odyssey from the dizzying heights of elation and awe to the punishing depths of grief and hard-won wisdom. This book’s visceral, lyrical prose sings the praises of the physical world’s wonders, while searching the souls of those willing, for better or worse, to fully embrace it.

 

New Books June 2011

These Just In
Put them on HOLD!!!

Now You See Her by James Patterson
Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich
Need we say more about these?

Silver Girl by Elin Hilderbrand
“Set against the backdrop of a stunning Nantucket summer, this suspenseful story explores the power of friendship, the pull of love, and the beauty of forgiveness.” Meredith’s “perfect” life crashes when her husband is revealed to have cheated his investment clients of billions of dollars. Her reunion with a former best friend helps her find the road to personal peace and second chances.

Carte Blanche: the new James Bond novel by Jeffrey Deaver
This is a new Bond, a post 9/11 Bond, a veteran of the Afghan war and recruited to service in a secret cell operating independent of the Ministry of Defense. When HQ decodes a message about an upcoming attack on Britain, Bond is given carte blanche to do whatever it takes to prevent the attack from taking place.

Against All Enemies by Tom Clancy
Mexican drug cartels and the Taliban conspire to bring terror and destruction to US streets. “In a story that races from the remote, war-scarred landscapes of the Middle East to the blood-soaked chaos of the U.S.-Mexican border, Tom Clancy once again delivers a heart-stopping thriller that is frighteningly close to reality.

The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry
Here’s what writer David Baldacci says about this book: “One of the most spellbinding and ingenious openings in all of thrillerdom…The cast of characters is huge but every one of them is memorable. The action is intense and masterfully choreographed. As always with Steve Berry, you’re educated about significant things while your knuckles are turning white and the pages are flying. The Jefferson Key is easily Cotton Malone’s most epic, swashbuckling adventure yet.”

To Be Sung Underwater by Tom McNeal
Judith Whitman’s twenty-five year marriage seems to be going south. Her thoughts return to a youthful love. “To Be Sung Underwater is the surprising and heartbreaking love story of a woman trying – almost too late – to remember, and the man who could never forget.”

now you see me by S.J.Bolton
In this modern gothic novel, DC Lacey Flint is confronted with a criminal who seems to be recreating the crimes of Jack the Ripper. Details in the case begin to remind Lacey of her past, the part of her past she’d prefer to keep hidden.

The Girl in the Blue Beret by Bobbie Ann Mason
Marshall Stone, as a WWII pilot, was shot down in Occupied Europe. Years later, he returns to visit the crash site and recollects the people who helped him escape from the Nazis, in particular, the girl in the blue beret. “Intimate and haunting, The Girl in the blue Beret is a beautiful and affecting story of love and courage, war and redemption, and the startling promise of second chances.”

Long Gone by Alafair Burke
Alice Humphrey thinks she has landed her dream job when she lands a position managing a new art gallery in Manhattan’s trendy Meatpacking District. “Everything is perfect until the morning Alice arrives at work to find the gallery gone-the space stripped bare as if it had never been there-and Drew Campbell’s dead body on the floor.” Campbell, the well-heeled gallery owner, now that he’s dead, is identified as somebody else. The artist whose work hung in the gallery doesn’t seem to exist. And, there’s a tie between the gallery and a missing girl. Alice has to sort through a criminal conspiracy…and dig up some dark family secrets…to sort things out, and save her own life.

"Quote" in these descriptions are taken from liner notes unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

June 2011-New Releases

Non-Fiction:

The Boundless Circle: Caring for Creatures and Creation by Michael W. Fox.  Some of us feel a kinship with animals, seeing them as part of the same process of Creation as ourselves. Others see humans as superior and animals as "ours" to exploit by right. Both views claim divine authority. Through his probing exploration of the spiritual and philosophical roots of animal rights, Michael Fox shows that humane and compassionate treatment of the animal world is both a spiritual and a survival imperative.

Gardening for a Lifetime: How to Garden Wiser As You Grow Older by Sydney Eddison.  In Gardening for a Lifetime, Sydney Eddison draws on her own forty years of gardening to provide a practical and encouraging roadmap for scaling back while keeping up with the gardening activities that each gardener loves most. Like replacing demanding plants like delphiniums with sturdy, relatively carefree perennials like sedums, rudbeckias, and daylilies. Or taking the leap and hiring help - another pair of hands, even for a few hours a week, goes a long way toward getting a big job done. Or maybe it makes sense to get rid of high-maintenance trees, shrubs, or perennials. This edition features a new chapter in which Sydney’s struggles with hip and back problems force her to walk the walk. As a friend of hers says, "Last summer you wrote the book. Now, I’m happy to see that you’ve read it." Gentle, personable, and practical, Gardening for a Lifetime will be welcomed by all gardeners looking to transform gardening from a list of daunting chores into the rewarding, joy-filled activity it was meant to be.

Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the Presentby Jeff Madrick.  Madrick makes clear that the single-minded pursuit of huge personal wealth did not start in the 2000s but has been on the rise in the United States since the 1970s. In telling the stories of these politicians, economists, and financiers--who declared a moral battle for freedom but gave rise to an age of greed--he traces the lineage of some of the nation's most pressing economic problems.

Yoga for Your Spiritual Muscles: A Complete Yoga Program to Strengthen Body and Spiritby Rachael Shaeffer.  Completely illustrated, this book features a complete yoga program including postures, breathing exercises, and relaxation techniques; plus touching personal stories and inspiring quotes. 175 photos beautifully photographed at the famed Pleasantdale Chateau, this illustrated book features touching personal stories, inspiring quotations, and easy-to-follow instructions for traditional yoga postures as well as for creating your own postures for each muscle.

The Hidden Gospel: Decoding the Spiritual Message of the Aramaic Jesus by Neil Douglas-Klotz.  In "The Hidden Gospel," Douglas-Klotz employs this approach to decode the spiritual and prophetic messages hidden within key words and concepts in the sayings and stories of Jesus. We learn to our delight, for instance, that when Jesus spoke of "goodness" he used a word which in Aramaic means "ripe" and refers to actions which are in time and tune with the Sacred Unity of all life. "The Hidden Gospel "aims to bridge the gap between the historical Jesus of the scholar and the Jesus of faith of Christian believers. It will appeal to everyone looking for an alternative spiritual vision of Jesus and his message.

A Still Forest Pool: The Insight Meditation of Achaan Chah compiled by Jack Kornfield and Paul Breiter.  Buddhist master Achaan Chah spent years meditating in a forest monastery of Thailand. This remarkable book reflects his simple and powerful message as well as the quiet, joyful Buddhist practice of dhudanga, or "everyday mindfulness," with profound insights for the West.

The Cynical Idealist: A Spiritual Biography of John Lennon by Gary Tillery.  A radio playlist could easily follow John Lennon's "Mind Games" with "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy." But comparing the two, it becomes obvious that Lennon had more in common with the great thinkers of any age than with the songwriters who were his contemporaries. "Cynical Idealist" reveals, for the first time, the spiritual odyssey of this extraordinary man. Out of a turbulent life, from his troubled, working-class childhood throughout his many roles -- Beatle, peace advocate, social activist, househusband -- Lennon managed to fashion a philosophy that elevates the human spirit and encourages people to work, individually and collectively, toward a better world. Like Socrates, Lennon wanted to stimulate people to think for themselves. "There ain't no guru who can see through your eyes," he sings in "I Found Out." "Cynical Idealist" beautifully articulates this and the other lessons John Lennon passed along through his songs and through the example of his life.

 

Fiction:

A Curtain Falls by Stefanie Pintoff.  Following on the heels of Pintoff's Edgar Award-winning debut "In the Shadow of Gotham, A Curtain Falls" is a moody and evocative tale of detective Simon Ziele and his partners who scour the dark streets of early-20th-century New York City in search of a true fiend. 

The careers of New York City detective Simon Ziele and his former partner, Captain Declan Mulvaney, went in remarkably different directions after the tragic death of Ziele’s fiancée in the 1904 General Slocum ferry disaster. While earmarked for bigger things, Ziele moved north of the city to escape the violence, and Mulvaney dug in deeper, heading up the precinct in the most crime-ridden part of New York.

Yet with all of the resources at Mulvaney’s disposal, a puzzling crime compels him to ask his former partner for help. A chorus girl has been found dead on a Broadway stage dressed as the lead. There is no sign of violence. The coroner would call it a suicide, but then she’d be the second actress to die that way in only days.

May 2011- New Releases

The Sixth Man by David Baldacci.  Sean King and Michelle Maxwell dig into the past of an alleged serial killer, but the more they investigate, the harder it is to separate fact from fiction. Each new revelation pushes them to the limit, and this deadly case might be the one that leaves the duo permanently parted.

 

Once Upon a Time There Was You by Elizabeth Berg.  A beautiful story about the power of love and family, this new novel by the beloved, bestselling author of "The Last Time I Saw You" follows the journey of a couple who meet again after their divorce.

Red on Red by Edward Conlon.  The author of the award-winning, "New York Times"-bestselling memoir "Blue Bloods" delivers his first novel--the story of two NYPD detectives with radically different approaches to life and work. 

Drawing Conclusions: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery by Donna Leon.  Though there are some signs of a struggle, the medical examiner rules that a widow died of a heart attack. Brunetti can't shake the feeling that something or someone may have triggered her heart attack. With the help of Inspector Vianello and the ever-resourceful Signorina Elettra, perhaps Brunetti can get to the truth and find some measure of justice.

Treason at Lisson Grove by Anne Perry.  "New York Times"-bestselling author Perry delivers her first Charlotte and Thomas Pitt mystery in three years--a tale of high-stakes murder and conspiracy with a cast of characters as rich as the Victorian London Perry evokes.

The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly. Mickey Haller has fallen on tough times. He expands his business into foreclosure defense, only to see one of his clients accused of killing the banker she blames for trying to take away her home.

The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the American West and the Yukon Gold Rush by Howard Blum.  It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures – gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen –are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who’ve outlived their usefulness.
But then gold is discovered in Alaska and the adjacent Canadian Klondike and a new frontier suddenly looms - an immense unexplored territory filled with frozen waterways, dark spruce forests, and towering mountains capped by
glistening layers of snow and ice.

Bossypants by Tina Fey. On her way to becoming an award-winning superstar, Tina Fey struggled through some questionable haircuts, some after-school jobs, the rise of nachos as a cultural phenomenon, a normal childhood, a happy marriage and joyful motherhood. Now she can reflect on what she's learned: you're no one until someone calls you bossy.

Unlimited: How to Build an Exceptional Life by Jillian Michaels.Imagine. Believe. Achieve.
Many self-help books offer a lot of new age platitudes and sappy mantras:
Just love yourself.
See the glass as half full.
Believe it and it will come.
Really? That’s not how it works, and you know it. A lifetime’s worth of struggle is not overturned in a small moment of positive thinking. But if you have the right attitude—attitude and skills—you can and will accomplish anything and everything you want. This book gives you both, attitude and action. By its end you will have all the tools you need to change your life. No hype. No false promises.

Salad As A Meal: Healthy Main-Dish Salads for Every Season by Patricia Wells. Wells, the grande dame of modern French cooking, is back with 150 original recipes for turning nature's best into delicious meals.

New for April 2011!

Non-fiction-

The Handmade Marketplace by Kari Chapin.  It's an exciting new world for crafters. Handmade is hip, creativity is what the market wants, and there are many profitable sales opportunities that didn't exist a few short years ago. For crafters who have more confidence running a sewing machine than setting up a Web site, The Handmade Marketplace breaks down and makes sense of the global possibilities for marketing and selling crafts. First, determine the right price for every item ' not too expensive and definitely not too cheap. Whether the product is beaded jewelry or felted slippers, illustrations or tote bags, author Kari Chapin helps crafters determine cost of goods, market competition, and the pros and cons of wholesale and retail sales. If the price is right, customers will buy. Then it's on to selling. The boom in indie craft fairs and sites such as Etsy ("Your place to buy & sell all things handmade") is providing artisans with an ever-expanding marketplace for handcrafted items. Chapin demystifies every venue. She explains the guidelines that craft fairs impose on exhibitors, the typical yearly calendar of shows, and how to start a new craft fair. For the crafter interested in online sales, there are tips on styling and propping crafts for photographs and technical explanations of how the most popular Web marketplaces run. Traditional brick and mortar consignment stores are still very good options for many crafters. Chapin explains how to approach shopkeepers and build strong relationships. Wrapping everything up with media advice and tips on how to get the word out, The Handmade Marketplace is the sales and marketing bible that today's crafters need.

 

Secrets of Dragon Gate: Ancient Taoist Practices for Health, Wealth, and the Art of Sexual Yoga by Steven Liu and Jonathan Blank.  From simple breathing exercises that make you feel healthier and more alive to advanced sexual yoga, The Secrets of Dragon Gate is the key to your unique path to health, wealth, and spiritual fulfillment. The Dragon Gate School is known for its singular combination of sexual yoga and dream yoga practices; mystical divination methods for choosing a wise and fruitful path; Chi-gung and martial arts practices for health and longevity; and profound philosophy, based on the I Ching (Book of Changes) and the five elements, that provides a deep insight into the nature of reality.  Incorporate the mysterious and ancient wisdom of the Dragon Gate School of Taoism into your daily life, and find answers to the question of how to live a long, prosperous, and happy life.

The Civil War: A Concise History by Louis P. Masur.   A masterful and eminently readable overview of the war’s multiple causes and catastrophic effects. Masur begins by examining the complex origins of the war, focusing on the pulsating tensions over states rights and slavery. The book then proceeds to cover, year by year, the major political, social, and military events, highlighting two important themes: how the war shifted from a limited conflict to restore the Union to an all-out war that would fundamentally transform Southern society, and the process by which the war ultimately became a battle to abolish slavery. Masur explains how the war turned what had been a loose collection of fiercely independent states into a nation, remaking its political, cultural, and social institutions. But he also focuses on the soldiers themselves, both Union and Confederate, whose stories constitute nothing less than America’s Iliad . In the final chapter Masur considers the aftermath of the South’s surrender at Appomattox and the clash over the policies of reconstruction that continued to divide President and Congress, conservatives and radicals, Southerners and Northerners for years to come. 

Fiction-

Sticky Fingers (A Roxy Abruzzo Mystery) by Nancy Martin.  Roxy Abruzzo barely escaped big trouble in her first adventure, "Foxy Roxy." Now Roxy is determined to stay on the straight and narrow--except that she gets in over her head doing a few jobs for her uncle Carmine, one of the last old time mob bosses in Pittsburgh.

Mystery: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman.  The closing of their favorite romantic rendezvous, the Fauborg Hotel in Beverly Hills, is a sad occasion for longtime patrons Alex Delaware and Robin Castagna. And gathering one last time with their fellow faithful habitués for cocktails in the gracious old venue makes for a bittersweet evening. But even more poignant is a striking young woman—alone and enigmatic among the revelers—waiting in vain in elegant attire and dark glasses that do nothing to conceal her melancholy. Alex can’t help wondering what her story is, and whether she’s connected to the silent, black-suited bodyguard lingering outside the hotel.  Two days later, Alex has even more to contemplate when police detective Milo Sturgis comes seeking his psychologist comrade’s insights about a grisly homicide. To Alex’s shock, the brutalized victim is the same beautiful woman whose lonely hours sipping champagne at the Fauborg may have been her last.  But with a mutilated body and no DNA match, she remains as mysterious in death as she seemed in life. And even when a tipster’s sordid revelation finally cracks the case open, the dark secrets that spill out could make Alex and Milo’s best efforts to close this horrific crime not just impossible but fatal.  Though Not Dead: A Kate Shugak Novel by Dana Stabenow.  In the newest entry in Dana Stabenow’s New York Times bestselling Kate Shugak series, Kate and the rest of the Park rats are stunned by the death of Old Sam, Kate’s eighty-seven-year-old uncle and foster father. In his will, he leaves almost everything to Kate, including a homestead deep in gold mining country that no one knew he had and a letter that reads simply, “Find my father.” Easier said than done, since Sam’s father is something of a mystery: an outsider who disappeared shortly after learning about Sam’s existence, he took with him a priceless tribal artifact, a Russian icon. During the first three days of Kate’s search, she gets shot at, whacked in the head, and run off the road in deep snow and left for dead. Interspersed with flashbacks from Sam’s fascinating life, including scenes from major events in Alaskan history, Kate does her best to fulfill Sam’s last wish—as various people follow her every move, in search of the icon, Old Sam’s gold, or possibly some other secret remnant of his long, mysterious life. 

AUGUST 2010 -THESE JUST IN!

These new titles have JUST arrived and are in the process of being processed. There are plenty of other new titles, too...like the new J.A. Jance, Queen of the Night and the new Phillipa Gregory, The Red Queen and Burn, the latest from Nevada Barr. What follows here is some info. about a few of our new titles from writers you may NOT already know...but who, we think, you'll want to become familiar with!

 Fiction-

I Curse the River of Time by Per Petterson. Arvid Jansen is trying to cope with his divorce and his mother's cancer diagnoses in 1989. As Arvid struggles to accommodate the changes to his present, he recollects summer holidays from his past, spent on the beach with his brothers. He also recalls the early days of his courtship and the idealism of his youth as a communist, so devoted to his working-class background that he spurned the college education that his mother had worked so hard to provide for him. This novel won the 2009 Nordic Council Literature Prize and the 2008 Norwegian Critics Prize. Readers may be familiar with his 2005 novel, Out Stealing Horses. I Curse the River of Time bears the hallmark compassion for humanity that has made Petterson an international favorite.

A Small Death in the Great Glen by A.D. Scott. This lyrical, haunting debut novel is about secrets, families and the forces of good and evil that dwell in every small town. Peter Robinson says that, "This atmospheric novel sets you firmly in small town Scotland of the 1950's. The characters are engaging and the suspense mounts along with a growing sense of dread as events surrounding the death of a young boy unfold." BOOKLIST, in a starred review, said, "This splendid debut mystery has everything going for it...The characters of the crusading small town newspaper are skillfully drawn and will have readers rooting for them unequivocally...captivating on every level."

 The Queen of Patpong by Timothy Hallinan. Author John Lescroart says, "You won't read a better thriller this year!" Bangkok-based American travel writer Poke Rafferty thought things were calming down in his world. He and his long-time love, Rose, finally made it through the marriage ceremony. Their adopted daughter, former street child Miaow, has become part of the family. Then a nightmare figure from Rose's time as a Patpong dancer barges into their world, shattering the peace they've worked so hard to obtain, threatening everything they cherish. The Queen of Patpong is a terrifying, heartbreaking, electrifying story of peril, love, and, ultimately, redemption.

The Black Minutes by Martin Solares. Told from multiple persepctives and filled with macabre details and surrealist elements that are interwoven throughout the narrative. This electrifying and highly original novel from a brilliant new voice has been published across Europe to great acclaim and rave reviews. The book is full of dark twists and turns, and populated by a cast of captivating...and mostly corrupt...characters. Junot Diaz calls this book, "A breathless, marvelous first novel...This is Latin American fiction at its pulpy phantasmagorical finest...a literary masterpiece masquerading as a police procedural and nothing else I've read this year comes close."

Non-fiction-

Brilliant: The Evolution of  Artifical Light by Jane Brox. In Brilliant, author Jane Brox traces the fascinating history of human light, from the stone lamps of the Pleistocene to the LEDs embedded in fabrics of the future, and reveals that the story of light is also the story of our evolving selves. This is a compelling story imbued with human voices, startling insights, and--only a few years before it becomes illegal to sell most incandescent light bulbs in the United States--timely questions about how the light of the future will shape our lives.

Grunts:Inside the American Infantry Combat Experience, World War II through Iraq by John C. McManus. McManus earned a PhD in American History and Military History and served as assistant director fo the Center for the Study of War and Society, helping to oversee a project collecting first-hand stories of American veterans. He teaches at the Missouri University of Science and Technology and also serves as the official historian for the U.S. Army's Seventh Infantry Regiment. In Grunts, McManus demonstrates that, from the beaches of the Second World War to the deserts of the middle east, the foot soldier has been the most indispensable...and most overlooked...factor in wartime victory. Examining ten critical battles, McManus covers six decades of warfare--from the 1944 fight on the island of Guam to today's counterinsurgency combat in Irag--in which the skills and courage of American troops proved the crucial difference between victory and defeat.

The Writing Warrior: Discovering the Courage to Free Your True Voice by Laraine Herring.In this work, Herring offers advice to writers who want to become more comfortable with their writing, face their inhibitions, and gain the confidence to release their true voice. Learn how to remove obstacles in your writing and develop techniques to help you relax into your own voice; discover ways to enter into a compassionate, non-judgemental relationship with yourself so that you can write safely and authentically from a place of absolute vulnerability; and discover the interconnectedness of your personal writing process and the community as a whole.

More Articles...

  1. New Releases - Jobs Grant